Hart House Hancock Lecture 2019

Handwriting text: Moving Towards a Disability Justice Revolution

In Canada, people with disabilities are consistently told, explicitly and implicitly, that we do not have the right to exist freely. In this lecture, Sarah Jama will discuss the ways the “disabled body” and “disabled mind” is treated through consumerist understandings in order to uphold every existing oppressive structure in our society. Sarah will discuss the history of the disability justice movement in Canada and the USA, unpack themes around global capitalism, the historical links between colonialism and ableism, and discuss how to build a world that truly uplifts the rights of people with disabilities. Lastly, she’ll walk you through her journey as an organizer, and the steps she has taken towards building inclusive movements. The answer to a better world is a revolution that centres disability justice. ...  Continue reading

Upcoming: Crip Technoscience for Disabled Cyborgs: Access, Community, Politics

Thursday March 21st 2019, 11am -1pm
Sensorium Loft
4th Floor of Goldfarb Centre for Fine Arts
York University

Kelly Fritsch engages with the emerging field of crip technoscience, exploring what it means for disability politics, community, and access. Taking up Alison Kafer’s provocation that disabled people are cyborgs because of their politics rather than their impairments, Fritsch explores the ways in which disabled community forms out of frictional and ambivalent relations to technoscience, marking out the implications of these relations for social justice practices. For accessibility and to RSVP please contactpvl@yorku.ca ...  Continue reading

Kelly Fritsch: Crip Commitments: Disability, Theory, Politics

Poster for event
Poster for Crip Commitments: Disability, Theory, Politics

The New College Disability Studies Speaker Series presents Crip Commitments: Disability, Theory, Politics

A Lecture by Prof. Kelly Fritsch (Carleton)

In collaboration with York University’s Peripheral Vision Speaker Series

Engaging the frictions of crip and disability theory, Kelly Fritsch non-innocently considers the possibilities of radical social change that emerge through knowing and making disability differently. ...  Continue reading

Jeff Thomas: winner of 2019 Governor General’s Award

Black and white image of white corn.
Jeff Thomas, White Corn, detail from panel, 1990, pigment print, 50.8 cm x 127 cm. Collection of the artist

Bodies in Translation collaborator Jeff Thomas has won the 2019 Governor General’s Award in Visual and Media Arts!

Jeff Thomas is a self-taught photo-based artist, writer, public speaker, and curator. He has works in major collections in Canada, the United States and Europe. Jeff’s solo shows include Birdman Rising, A Necessary Fiction: My Conversation with Edward S. Curtis & George Hunter, The Dancing Grounds, and Resistance Is NOT Futile. He has also been in many group shows, including The Family Camera; Toronto: Tributes + Tributaries, 1971-1989; Land/Slide: Possible Futures; SAKAHÀN; and UNMASKING: Arthur Renwick, Adrian Stimson, Jeff Thomas. He has received the Canada Council’s Duke and Duchess of York Award in Photography, the Karsh Award in photography, and a REVEAL Indigenous Art Award, and he has been inducted into the Royal Canadian Academy of Art. An urban-based Iroquois, Jeff was born in Buffalo, New York, and now lives in Ottawa, Ontario. ...  Continue reading

Cripping as Disrupting

Performer with prosthetics doing a hand stand on wheelchair
Erin Ball performs in Crip Shorts. Photo: Michelle Peek Photography courtesy of Bodies in Translation: Activist Art, Technology & Access to Life.

“The theme of disruption carried throughout the symposium with discussions about breaking down exclusionary environments and practices, and the silos that enclose Deaf, Disabled and Mad arts. While the contemporary art world often touts diversity and equality, the spaces in which it’s programmed and the rules by which it’s governed often operate on white, settler and patriarchal models. The mission of disabled artists and their allies is not only to increase visibility for marginalized artists but to break down, or crip, the colonial and ableist structures that have alienated them. ...  Continue reading

Bridging forward: Accessible Arts Festival

A woman's face with cloudy abstract imagery superimposed

Inclusive Arts London is a regional collective dedicated to developing opportunities for artists and individuals who identify as deaf, disabled and/or mad.

From June to July,  Inclusive Arts London’s Bridging Forward: Accessibility Arts Festival is bringing exciting works from local, provincial, and national artists to London Ontario. See upcoming program below! ...  Continue reading

Hear, Feel, See, What!

Artist Jenelle Rouse posing in dance

Centre[3] for Print and Media Arts in Hamilton and VibraFusionLab in London, Ontario present Hear, Feel, See What!, a collaborative speculative soundscape and interactive installation. Five artists from Hamilton, London, and Toronto, including hearing, hard of hearing and Deaf artists, and an archivist co-authored a piece that captures and documents both the audio and vibrations of historical, existing, and future sounds of Hamilton and London. In a society that is in a constant state of rapid change, this piece aims to collect and preserve city sounds before they are lost to history. ...  Continue reading