Jeff Thomas on Disability Visibility Project

Alice Wong’s podcast episode #51 features an interview with Jeff Thomas, urban Iroquois photographer, artist, researcher, public speaker, curator and BIT collaborator. Jeff talks about racism, indigeneity, colonialism and how his photography re-contextualizes historical images of First Nations people. ...  Continue reading

Reframing Difference

Image of quote: I'm interested in disability justice because it's important to live in a society where you don't have to hide your disability.

Produced in support of the 2019 Hart House Hancock Lecture by Sarah Jama, Moving Toward a Disability Justice Revolution, the purpose of this podcast is to amplify the voices of people with disabilities and to emphasize actions U of T can take to make the university more inclusive. Kate Welsh, MEd, disability activist and artists, interviews students and has frank, open conversations. ...  Continue reading

Defying Barriers

Poster for Defying Barriers

Community members, researchers and students are invited to join the McMaster Faculty of Humanities and the McMaster Institute for Research on Aging on May 15th from 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. for Defying Barriers, a workshop examining how aging and disability impact engagement with the arts, and how we can enable participation and expression through a variety of artistic media. ...  Continue reading

Dreams, Visions, Hallucinations: Disability and other ways of seeing with Mona Stonefish and Dolleen Tisawii’ashii Manning

Poster for event with information and images of Mona Stonefish and Dolleen Tisawii’ashii Manning

March 6, 2019, 4-5:30 pm in the Joe G. Green Theatre.

Presented by Sensorium, VISTA and The Peripheral Visions Speaker Series.

Dolleen Tisawii’ashiiManning hosts a public conversation with Traditional Doctor and Elder Mona Stonefish on Anishinaabe dream imaging practices and their implications for critical disability studies. Manning worked with her mother and Stonefish in developing her mnidoo theory of consciousness. This interrelational understanding of perception and knowing involves a possession by these living potencies, along with an expanded understanding of vision. In this discussion, they question western conceptions of ability and disability, while also considering the debilitating impact of colonialism. ...  Continue reading

Hart House Hancock Lecture 2019

Handwriting text: Moving Towards a Disability Justice Revolution

In Canada, people with disabilities are consistently told, explicitly and implicitly, that we do not have the right to exist freely. In this lecture, Sarah Jama will discuss the ways the “disabled body” and “disabled mind” is treated through consumerist understandings in order to uphold every existing oppressive structure in our society. Sarah will discuss the history of the disability justice movement in Canada and the USA, unpack themes around global capitalism, the historical links between colonialism and ableism, and discuss how to build a world that truly uplifts the rights of people with disabilities. Lastly, she’ll walk you through her journey as an organizer, and the steps she has taken towards building inclusive movements. The answer to a better world is a revolution that centres disability justice. ...  Continue reading