Jeff Thomas: winner of 2019 Governor General’s Award

Black and white image of white corn.
Jeff Thomas, White Corn, detail from panel, 1990, pigment print, 50.8 cm x 127 cm. Collection of the artist

Bodies in Translation collaborator Jeff Thomas has won the 2019 Governor General’s Award in Visual and Media Arts!

Jeff Thomas is a self-taught photo-based artist, writer, public speaker, and curator. He has works in major collections in Canada, the United States and Europe. Jeff’s solo shows include Birdman Rising, A Necessary Fiction: My Conversation with Edward S. Curtis & George Hunter, The Dancing Grounds, and Resistance Is NOT Futile. He has also been in many group shows, including The Family Camera; Toronto: Tributes + Tributaries, 1971-1989; Land/Slide: Possible Futures; SAKAHÀN; and UNMASKING: Arthur Renwick, Adrian Stimson, Jeff Thomas. He has received the Canada Council’s Duke and Duchess of York Award in Photography, the Karsh Award in photography, and a REVEAL Indigenous Art Award, and he has been inducted into the Royal Canadian Academy of Art. An urban-based Iroquois, Jeff was born in Buffalo, New York, and now lives in Ottawa, Ontario. ...  Continue reading

Cripping as Disrupting

Performer with prosthetics doing a hand stand on wheelchair
Erin Ball performs in Crip Shorts. Photo: Michelle Peek Photography courtesy of Bodies in Translation: Activist Art, Technology & Access to Life.

“The theme of disruption carried throughout the symposium with discussions about breaking down exclusionary environments and practices, and the silos that enclose Deaf, Disabled and Mad arts. While the contemporary art world often touts diversity and equality, the spaces in which it’s programmed and the rules by which it’s governed often operate on white, settler and patriarchal models. The mission of disabled artists and their allies is not only to increase visibility for marginalized artists but to break down, or crip, the colonial and ableist structures that have alienated them. ...  Continue reading

Upcoming Exhibitions Featuring Vanessa Dion Fletcher

Vanessa Dion Fletcher is an accomplished artist and Bodies in Translation artist-in-residence for 2018. She is a graduate of The School of The Art Institute of Chicago, where she obtained her M.F.A. in 2016. Vanessa has received several awards for her work, including the Textile Museum of Canada Melissa Levin Emerging Artist Award. For more information about Vanessa, please visit her website: www.dionfletcher.com/ ...  Continue reading

Bridging forward: Accessible Arts Festival

A woman's face with cloudy abstract imagery superimposed

Inclusive Arts London is a regional collective dedicated to developing opportunities for artists and individuals who identify as deaf, disabled and/or mad.

From June to July,  Inclusive Arts London’s Bridging Forward: Accessibility Arts Festival is bringing exciting works from local, provincial, and national artists to London Ontario. See upcoming program below! ...  Continue reading

Hear, Feel, See, What!

Artist Jenelle Rouse posing in dance

Centre[3] for Print and Media Arts in Hamilton and VibraFusionLab in London, Ontario present Hear, Feel, See What!, a collaborative speculative soundscape and interactive installation. Five artists from Hamilton, London, and Toronto, including hearing, hard of hearing and Deaf artists, and an archivist co-authored a piece that captures and documents both the audio and vibrations of historical, existing, and future sounds of Hamilton and London. In a society that is in a constant state of rapid change, this piece aims to collect and preserve city sounds before they are lost to history. ...  Continue reading

Off the Cuff: Mnidoo Infinity Squeezed through Finite Modulations

Bodies in Translation is pleased to be co-presenting Off the Cuff: Mnidoo Infinity Squeezed through Finite Modulations, a special presentation by Dolleen Tisawii’ashii Manning (McGill University).

In this talk, Dr. Manning will discuss her dissertation on mnidoo-worlding or mnidoo-consciousnessing and its temporal bending interrelational ethics, specifically its implications for disability studies. ...  Continue reading

Interview with David Bobier

The image is a colour photograph of David Bobier, with his hair pulled back in a ponytail, wearing a black sweater and glasses. His right hand is extended and adjusting a Vibro-projector. 

We were thrilled to interview David Bobier, co-lead of Bodies in Translation: Accessing the Arts via email.
David Bobier is a hard-of-hearing media artist and the parent of two deaf children. David conducts research into employing vibrotactile technology as a creative medium at VibraFusionLab in London, Ontario. He also is founder and co-chair of Inclusive Arts London and has been conducting research and collaborative initiatives with the Deaf and Disability Arts communities in the UK. Click here to read the full interview. ...  Continue reading

Activism, Art and Academia talk about Death

Presented by the Studio for Media Activism and Critical Thought, The ARTivism Lab Speaker Series

When my grandfather died nearly ten years ago, my family and friends said, “death is a part of life.” It’s a saying I’m sure many of us have heard. However, over time, I noticed there is an underlying falseness to this because death is not an active part of our lives. We never discuss how we feel about death unless we are in mourning. -Hailey Krychman ...  Continue reading

Flourishing Call for Submissions

Image of Tangled Art Gallery

Tangled Art + Disability is currently accepting applications from Canadian Mad, Deaf, & disability identified artists from across Canada to take part in an upcoming series titled Flourishing.

Information from Tangled:
Tangled is searching for seven (7) artists from across Canada to contribute artistic work centering the experiences of Deaf, Mad and disability-identified folk in exploring what it means to “flourish”. With this exhibition series Tangled seeks to discover and expand new understandings of flourishing and to affirm how we may live and thrive even when society may expect differently. Flourishing can and does happen in unexpected ways, despite widely held ableist beliefs that disability, frailty and suffering make it no longer possible. ...  Continue reading