TEAM

Our research at Bodies in Translation is animated by two guiding principles: to incite and catalyze generative collaborations among artist and academics across disciplinary, sectorial, cultural, and other divides; and to centralize culturally, cognitively, affectively, and physically diverse artist practitioners as members of communities whose voices and self-representations have been marginalized from mainstream social discourses, cultural landscapes and art institutions across our province and country.

Embodying these principles of catalyzing collaborations and centralizing non-normative artistic creation, our team consists of two Project Directors, a management committee; a big picture committee; and over 70 partners and collaborators who are researchers, artist-academics, practicing artists, and community leaders.

Management Committee

Carla RiceCarla Rice, Co-Director

Dr. Carla Rice is Full Professor and Canada Research Chair at the University of Guelph. A leader in the field of embodiment studies in Canada, her research explores cultural representations and stories of body and identity. She founded Re•Vision: The Centre for Art and Social Justice, a cutting-edge research creation centre with a mandate to use arts-informed and community engaged research methods to foster inclusive communities, well-being, equity, and justice within Canada and beyond. She has received numerous awards for advocacy, research, and mentorship, and was inducted into the Royal Society of Canada, College of New Scholars, Artists and Scientists in November 2017. She has published 4 books, 69 papers, 26 chapters, and 13 reports; produced over 500 films; and delivered hundreds of keynote addresses, training workshops, consultations, and presentations, nationally and internationally. She currently directs or co-leads nine research grants, including Bodies in Translation: Activist Art, Technology and Access to Life. Notable books include Gender and Women’s Studies: Critical Terrain (2nd edition, 2018), and Becoming Women: The Embodied Self in Image Culture (2014).

For more information on Re•Vision go to: https://projectrevision.ca/ or information on Carla go to http://www.carlarice.ca.

Image: A middle aged woman wearing a red leather jacket and smiling.

 


 

Eliza Chandler

Eliza Chandler, Co-Director

Eliza Chandler is an Assistant Professor in the School of Disability Studies at Ryerson University and Co-Director of Bodies in Translation. In 2014-2016 she was a postdoctoral research fellow in Ryerson’s School of Disability Studies as well as the founding Artistic Director of Tangled Art Gallery, Canada’s first art gallery dedicated to showcasing disability art and advancing accessible curatorial practice. Eliza serves as a director on the Ontario Arts Council Board of directors and is a practicing disability artist and curator. Chandler regularly give lectures, interviews, and consultations related to disability arts, accessible curatorial practices, and disability politics in Canada.

Image: A thin white woman with a pensive face, short hair, and wearing a white blazer stands in front of a large oil painting of a woman.

 


 

Ingrid MundelIngrid Mündel, Managing Director

Ingrid Mündel is the Managing Director at Re•Vision: The Centre for Art and Social Justice at the University of Guelph, Ontario. Ingrid holds a PhD in Literature and Performance Studies from the University of Guelph and is an experienced community-based researcher, facilitator, and educator with a particular interest in art-based approaches to community dialogue and social change.

Image: A smiling white woman with shoulder length brown hair wearing a striped grey collared shirt.

 


 

Tracy TidgwellTracy Tidgwell, Project Manager

Tracy Tidgwell is a community organizer, researcher, activist, and cultural producer who has been working in the folds of Toronto’s queer arts communities over the past many years in performance, video, analog photography, and writing. She explores process, connection, creativity, love, and queerness in all of her work and is dedicated to the wellness, resilience, and liberation of all people.

Image: A close up image of a fat white woman’s face. The backdrop is a body of grey-green water and blue sky and there’s a small island in the distance. The woman’s dark eyes are looking directly at the camera and her smile is subtle. She is wearing a black brimmed cap and a fluffy, bright pink wooly sweater. Her long brown hair blows in the wind.

 


 

Lindsay FisherLindsay Fisher, Artistic Producer

Lindsay is a multi-disciplinary artist, curator, and producer working in the arts and not-for-profit sector. Lindsay devotes most of her time exploring creative ways that accessibility aesthetics impacts curatorial arts, arts culture and design thinking. Lindsay is the Founder and Director of Creative Users Projects, a disability-led non-for-profit arts organization that explores the intersection of art and design, accessibility, and disability through collaborative projects with artists and communities. As an artist with a disability herself, Lindsay is motivated by a desire to build more opportunities and spaces with different bodies in mind and to highlight the ways that activism and disability arts culture is reshaping Canada’s arts ecology. Lindsay holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Emily Carr University and a Bachelor of Graphic Design from OCAD University.

Image: Black and white close up image of Lindsay smiling at the camera. She is a white woman with long dark wavy hair, dark eyes and eyebrows.

 


 

Nadine ChangfootNadine Changfoot, Team Member

Nadine Changfoot is Associate Professor in Political Studies, Trent University. Nadine has worked with Re•Vision since 2012, beginning with the CIHR funded project “Mobilizing New Meanings of Disability and Difference.” With BIT, Nadine is a member of the Management Committee, co-lead of Research Stream 5, Mobilizing the Arts: Artistic and Activist Methodologies and Pedagogies which, through an iterative process, aims to make BIT research creation and outputs accessible to the public, and will be co-leading a series of multimedia digital storytelling workshops with older adults in partnership with the Trent Centre of Aging Studies. She is also researcher on the SSHRC funded partnership, Community First (CFICE): Impacts of Community-Campus Engagement. CFICE is working to establish and strengthen community-campus partnerships on a regional and national scale. Nadine’s research is collaborative; she has published widely at the intersection of critical disability studies, feminist thought, aging studies, methodology, and community-engaged research.

Image: Holding a microphone, Nadine delights in answering a question at ReFrame Film Festival in Peterborough 2015 about the growing archive of Re•Vision multimedia digital stories. Her hair is long and black, and she is now proudly growing-in the platinum, so this photo will soon change.

 


 

Andrea LaMarreAndrea LaMarre, Knowledge Mobilization Coordinator

Andrea LaMarre, MSc., is a PhD candidate working with Dr. Carla Rice on her dissertation project, which examines the experiences of people in recovery from eating disorders using a qualitative, arts-based, and feminist-informed lens. Her work complicates what it means to be recovered in a society that makes some bodies unwelcome. Andrea is also active in the eating disorder activist community, working to support policy changes to increase the accessibility of timely and appropriate support for diverse people with eating disorders. She has facilitated over 10 digital storytelling workshops and continues to work with Dr. Rice and other scholars and artists to explore the use of the method.

Image: Andrea, a white woman with long dark brown hair with straight-across bangs looks at the camera.

 

Big Picture Committee

Archiving and Historicizing the Arts: Recollecting Histories of Difference

Karen YoshidaKaren Yoshida, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor at the Department of Physical Therapy, University of Toronto. She has initiated and led an innovative Critical Disability Studies and health and wellness/diversity component, with disability rights communities in Toronto within this department since 1987. She is a member of the Rehabilitation Science Institute, Dalla Lana School of Public Health and the Collaborative Program in Women’s Health, University of Toronto. In 2008 she was a Fellow in Columbia University’s Summer Institute on Oral History (topic: Narrating the Body: Oral History, Narrative and Embodied Performance). Her current research focuses on Activist Disability Oral History, arts-based research and dissemination, disability leadership, embodiment and women living with disabilities and their access to health services. As part of the Bodies in Translation Partnership grant, Dr Yoshida is leading an oral history study on Canadian disabled and cultural activists.

Image: Head and shoulder image of Karen looking towards the outside of the frame. She is smiling with a slight gaze upwards. Karen has black straight hair parted on the right side that is just above shoulder length. She has dark brown eyes. She has on a burgundy shirt with a v neck opening and a collar.

 


 

Jay DolmageJay Dolmage is committed to disability rights in his scholarship, service, and teaching. His work brings together rhetoric, writing, disability studies, and critical pedagogy. He is the Founding Editor of the Canadian Journal of Disability Studies and is an associate professor of English at the University of Waterloo. He is also the author of three books: Disability Rhetoric, Academic Ableism, and Disabled Upon Arrival.

Image: A white man wearing glasses and a blue shirt with a cardigan over top of it, leans against a counter with a long set of shelves holding library books behind him. There is an open laptop computer just behind him on the counter.

 

Accessing the Arts: Technological Innovation and Aesthetic Possibilities

 

Colin ClarkColin Clark is a video artist, composer, and design researcher at OCAD University’s Inclusive Design Research Centre. He is a co-founder of the Fluid Project, an open community dedicated to growing new inclusive co-design tools and practices. Colin has worked as a designer and technologist in the field of inclusive design for over 20 years. As an artist, his digital videos explore relationships between technology, nature, and time, often incorporating personal image and sound processing techniques. His music has been performed by Arraymusic, the neither/nor collective, the Draperies, and his own ensembles, Lions and Fleischmop. Colin’s soundtracks to experimental films and installations by Izabella Pruska-Oldenhof and R. Bruce Elder have been shown at film festivals internationally.

Image: A photo of Colin taken in Northern Ireland. Dark clouds over the ocean and rocks are in the background. Gazing downwards, he is wearing a warm hat and jacket, holding a video camera.

 


 

David BobierDavid Bobier is a media artist, educator, arts administrator and curator. He is the Founder, Director and Curator of VibraFusionLab in London, Ontario, an arts-based public studio that investigates multi-sensory artistic modalities in the creation and presentation of art by and for people of all abilities. His artistic practice has been recognized in numerous solo and group exhibitions and has been the recipient of a number of Canada Council for the Arts and Ontario Arts Council grants. He has served in advisory roles in developing Deaf and Disability Arts Equity programs for both Canada Council for the Arts and the Ontario Arts Council. He is hard of hearing and is the parent of two deaf children.

Image: A white man with long white hair a white mustache, wearing black framed glasses and a black t-shirt is sitting at a vintage wooden desk. He is looking at a grey object with a light and a narrow strip of paper and his hand is on top of the object.

 


 

Dawn OwenDawn Owen is Curator of Guelph Museums. She is also an educator and artist in photo‐based practices, and a writer, editor, and publication manager in visual arts publishing. Owen holds a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) degree, specializing in studio art, from the University of Guelph and a Master of Fine Art–Visual Arts degree from York University (Toronto). She has worked in the public art gallery sector since 1998. Owen is committed to the growth and engagement of accessible programming at the Art Gallery of Guelph — she will support and facilitate the curatorial goals of the BIT Project, with a focus on collaborative and creative exhibitions and outreach.

 

Cultivating the Arts: Aesthetics and Artistic Development

 

Dolleen Tisawii’ashii ManningDr. Dolleen Tisawii’ashii Manning is a member of Kettle and Stoney Point First Nations, an artist, scholar, and youngest of twelve. Currently, she is a postdoctoral fellow with the International Institute for Critical Studies in Improvisation (IICSI), hosted by the Institute for the Public Life of Arts and Ideas (IPLAI) at McGill University. Manning received her PhD recently from the Centre for the Study of Theory and Criticism at the University of Western Ontario, and holds graduate degrees in contemporary art (MFA, Simon Fraser, 1997) and critical theory (MA, UWO, 2005). She is also a recipient of the SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellowship, held at Michigan State University, MI, USA, commencing September 2018-2020. She works at the intersection of Anishinaabe ontology and epistemology, critical theory, phenomenology, and art. Manning has chapters published in Intensities and Lines of Flight: Deleuze/Guattari and the Arts, eds. Antonio Calcagno, et al. (Rowman and Littlefield 2014), and Feminist Phenomenology Futures, eds. Helen Fielding and Dorothea Olkowski (Indiana UP 2017). For the BIT project, Manning is co-facilitating the cultivating the arts stream with Mary Bunch, as well as developing collaborative workshops and symposiums with art components, in Montreal and Toronto.

Image: This photograph shows Manning giving a talk at Forest City Gallery in London Ontario, June 2013, as part of the Ontario Arts Council’s Aboriginal Curator’s Project. Manning is imaged, hands folded together, smiling under a bright light in front of a sculpture by Dion called Shield Wall. This is a detail shot of two of seven shields that hang from the ceiling. Each is mainly comprised of green computer components that have been cut up, partly painted yellow, blue and orange, and reconfigured to resemble star blanket designs.

 


 

Mary BunchMary Bunch is a Faculty Lecturer at the Institute for Gender, Sexuality and Feminist Studies at McGill University. Her Ph.D. in Theory and Criticism is from the University of Western Ontario. Her research interests include disability, queer, and feminist theory, and social and political thought. Her current project, a monograph titled Ecstatic Freedom, explores a shift in contemporary queer, crip and decolonial social movements from individualized, neoliberal forms of freedom, to an emancipatory concept based on an ethics of relationality, solidarity, and nonmastery. Dr. Bunch has published articles in the Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies, Culture, Theory and Critique, Feminist Theory, and the Canadian Journal of Human Rights. Her role in the BIT project includes co-facilitation of the cultivating the arts stream with Dolleen Manning, as well as developing collaborative workshops and symposiums with art components, in Montreal and Toronto.

Image: This is a head and shoulder portrait of Mary Bunch showing a smiling white woman with shoulder length light brown hair and green eyes, wearing a brown shirt. She is off-centred, leaning in from the right side of the frame. Behind her on the left are rows of parked bicycles.

 

Activating the Arts: Arts and/as Activism

 

Christine KellyChristine Kelly, PhD is an Assistant Professor in Community Health Sciences at the University of Manitoba. Informed by feminist and critical disability scholarship, Christine uses qualitative methods to explore the politics of care, aging and Canadian disability movements. Dr. Kelly and Dr. Michael Orsini co-edited Mobilizing Metaphor: Art, Culture and Disability Activism in Canada (UBC Press, 2016) and Dr. Kelly authored Disability Politics and Care: The Challenge of Direct Funding (UBC Press, 2016). For more information, see www.christinekelly.ca. For the BIT project, Dr. Kelly and Dr. Orsini will co-lead the stream Activating the Arts: Arts and/as Activism.

Image: A young white woman leans on a wooden and metal railing facing the camera and smiling.

 


 

Michael OrsiniMichael Orsini is Full Professor in the School of Political Studies at the University of Ottawa and currently Vice-Dean, Graduate Studies in the Faculty of Social Sciences. He is the co-editor (with Christine Kelly) most recently of Mobilizing Metaphor: Art, Culture and Disability Activism in Canada (UBC Press, 2016). He is currently completing a SSHRC project on the role of emotions and stigma in a range of contested policy fields and a CIHR-funded study on the criminalization of HIV nondisclosure in Canada.

 

Mobilizing Artistic and Activist Methodologies

 

Stephanie SpringgayStephanie Springgay is an Associate Professor in the Department of Curriculum, Teaching, and Learning at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto. Her research focuses on the intersections between contemporary art and pedagogy, with a particular interest in theories of matter, movement and affect. Her most recent research-creation projects are documented at www.thepedagogicalimpulse.com, www.walkinglab.org and www.artistsoupkitchen.com. She has published widely in academic journals and is the co-author of the book Walking Methodologies in More-than-Human World: Walkinglab Routledge (2018), with Sarah E. Truman; co-editor of M/othering a Bodied Curriculum: Emplacement, Desire, Affect University of Toronto Press, with Debra Freedman; co-editor of Curriculum and the Cultural Body, Peter Lang with Debra Freedman; and author of Body Knowledge and Curriculum: Pedagogies of Touch in Youth and Visual Culture, Peter Lang.

Image: A head shot of a female academic with blond hair, turquoise glasses, wearing white and black printed dress.

 


 

Nadine ChangfootNadine Changfoot, Team Member

Nadine Changfoot is Associate Professor in Political Studies, Trent University. Nadine has worked with Re•Vision since 2012, beginning with the CIHR funded project “Mobilizing New Meanings of Disability and Difference.” With BIT, Nadine is a member of the Management Committee, co-lead of Research Stream 5, Mobilizing the Arts: Artistic and Activist Methodologies and Pedagogies which, through an iterative process, aims to make BIT research creation and outputs accessible to the public, and will be co-leading a series of multimedia digital storytelling workshops with older adults in partnership with the Trent Centre of Aging Studies. She is also researcher on the SSHRC funded partnership, Community First (CFICE): Impacts of Community-Campus Engagement. CFICE is working to establish and strengthen community-campus partnerships on a regional and national scale. Nadine’s research is collaborative; she has published widely at the intersection of critical disability studies, feminist thought, aging studies, methodology, and community-engaged research.

Image: Holding a microphone, Nadine delights in answering a question at ReFrame Film Festival in Peterborough 2015 about the growing archive of Re•Vision multimedia digital stories. Her hair is long and black, and she is now proudly growing-in the platinum, so this photo will soon change.