bodies in translation: activist art, technology and access to life.

Artist Jenelle Rouse

Bodies in Translation: Activist Art, Technology, and Access to Life (BIT), is a multidisciplinary, university-community research project that at its core, aims to cultivate and research activist art.

In this project, ‘activist art’ refers to: fat, aging, disability, d/Deaf, and mad art through a decolonizing lens. We, the researchers, artists, curators, practitioners, and community members on this grant, explore the relationship between cultivating activist art and achieving social and political justice. We believe that activist art holds the power to represent these aggrieved communities who are routinely represented as non-vital, a representation that often produces violent and even deadly effects– differently; as artistic, creative, agentive, political, community-connected, and full of vitality.

Bodies in Translation Principles of Governance and Engagement.

Watch the Bodies in Translation Principles of Governance and Engagement which outlines the four guiding principles that inform our project governance, relationships, and activities.​

" Let’s try thinking of accessibility as a creative, long-term process. It’s not just about the built environment, but about ideas of agency and power. "
Carmen Papalia
Artist

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Re•Vision: The Centre for Art and Social Justice

Bodies in Translation is a project of Re•Vision: The Centre for Art and Social Justice at the University of Guelph.

Re•Vision specializes in the use of visual, digital, and sensory methods. Re•Vision is an assemblage of social science research projects dedicated to exploring ways that marginalized and misrepresented communities can use the arts to advance social inclusion and justice by challenging stereotypes.

Accessibility

We recognize that accessibility is a dynamic process. If you found any part of this website to be inaccessible to you, please email Kayla Besse at kbesse@uoguelph.ca with feedback.

Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada Bodies in Translation logo. It is a series of overlapping circles in blue, yellow, red, and green. Next to the circles, there is black text in all caps that reads: Bodies in Translation: Activist Art, Technology, and Access to Life.       University of Guelph College of Social and Applied Human Sciences logo.